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2013 CCR

2013 Consumer Confidence Report

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Town of Stedman

PWS ID# 03-26-030

We are pleased to present to you this year's Annual Drinking Water Quality Report. This report is a review of last year’s water quality. Included are details about the source of your drinking water, what it contains, and how it compares to standards set by regulatory agencies. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water and to providing you with this information, because informed customers are our best allies. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water, please contact Jennifer Wilson-Kersh at 910-323-1892. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the 1st Thursday of each month at 7:00PM at the Stedman Town Hall.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; and radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

The water that is used by this system is surface water that is treated and purchased from the Public Works Commission of Fayetteville. Please see the City of Fayetteville’s 2013 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report at http://www.faypwc.com/brochures/water_quality.pdf to find the source of their drinking water, as well as more in depth lab testing results of tests performed on your drinking water.

We routinely monitor for over 150 contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected in the last round of sampling for the particular contaminant group. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 through December 31, 2013. The EPA or the State requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, is more than one year old.

Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted.

Important Drinking Water Definitions:

Action Level (AL) - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

No Detects (ND)- Testing results were not found in measurable quantities for the test performed.

Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Extra Note: MCLs are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

 

Contaminant (units)

Sample

Date

Your

Water

# of sites found above the AL

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper (ppm)

(90th percentile)

2011

ND

0

1.3

AL = 1.3ppm

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives.

Lead (ppb)

(90th percentile)

`2011

ND

0

0

AL = 15ppb

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits.

Asbestos

2013

ND

0

 

7MFL

Millions per Liter

Asbestos Cement Pipe

Microbiological Contaminants Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Contaminants

 

Contaminant (units)

MCL

Violation

Y/N

 

Your Water

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Likely Source of Contamination

Total Coliform Bacteria

(presence or absence)

N

ND

0

One positive monthly sample

Naturally present in the environment

Fecal Coliform or E. coli

(presence or absence)

`N

ND

0

0 (Note: The MCL is exceeded if a routine sample and repeat sample are total coliform positive, and one is also fecal coliform or E. coli positive)

Human and animal fecal waste

 

Contaminant (units)

MCL/MRDL

Violation

Y/N

Your Water

(AVG)

Range

Low     High

 

MCLG

 

MCL

 

Likely Source of  Contamination

TTHM (ppb)

(Total Trihalomethanes)

N

53ppb

38-64 ppb

N/A

80

By-product of drinking water chlorination

HAA5 (ppb)

(Total Haloacetic Acids)

N

31ppb

22-41 ppb

N/A

60

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Chlorine (ppm)

N

2.1ppm

0.4-2.6 ppm

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4

Water additive used to control microbes

 

 

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